Live Healthy Simply | Film Review: Hungry For Change
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Film Review: Hungry For Change

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Film Review: Hungry For Change

  |   Film Reviews, Lifestyle, Wellness and Personal Development   |   13 Comments

Last night I ate Vegan Quesadillas on the couch and watched the premiere of Hungry For Change – I always thought it was going to be good, I just didn’t realise it was going to be THIS Good!

The same people who bought us Food Matters are the makers of  Hungry For Change. It’s shot in the same documentary style and features among others, Dr Joseph Mercola, Kris Carr, Joe Cross, Dr Alejandro Junger and my favourite raw food advocate David Wolfe.

Photo Via Hungry For Change 

‘Hungry For Change’ exposes shocking secrets the diet, weight loss and food industry don’t want you to know about. Deceptive strategies designed to keep you craving more and more. Needless to say, if you are battling weight issues this film is a MUST see.

The film gave Sugar a terrible wrap. And MSG, I had no idea you were in 80% of modern foods; well I wouldn’t would I, because you are HIDDEN under 60 different names on the ingredients label! And last but certainly not least Aspartame – I am SO glad I never drank you, the side effects you cause are REALLY scary.

Question: Have you watched Hungry For Change or Food Matters? What did you think of the films?

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13 Comments
  • Sambodhi Prem | Mar 23, 2012 at 5:56 am

    I saw the movie "Hungry For Change" yesterday – I like the overall message, but I have a few points I'd like to add:

    • If you look at food from an evolutionary point of view, then you have to look at meat, raw milk and eggs as excellent sources of nutrients – we have eaten these foods since the big bang… well no, but since our cave dwelling days anyway…

    • Include how to grow nutrient-dense food, because we have lost the art of soil replenishment, much of our vegetables are inferior as a source of nutrients. The tomato you bought 10 years ago is not the same as the one you buy today, because the negligent way conventional agriculture looks after the soil. They unfortunately put very little back.
    The work of Dr Carey Reams on soil health would be important to mention.

    • The emotional and spiritual aspects of obesity – negative self-image (touched upon in the movie) is largely due to (Western) repressive attitudes – how to deal with them? Is it enough to stick a positive affirmation on your bathroom's mirror? Or is a deeper cleansing of the mind required? A technique like Osho Dynamic meditation, perhaps?

    Together with my partner Sandipa I have written a book that discusses many of these points and more, it's called "The All And Everything of Healthy Living", it's free here: http://bit.ly/GJf5sk

    • Jessica Nazarali

      Jessica Nazarali | Mar 23, 2012 at 11:22 pm

      Thank you for your interesting point of view, I'm off to download your book

    • Kiara | Jul 26, 2012 at 5:00 pm

      Sambodhi, your logic could not possibly be more flawed.

      First of all, your argument that eating meat is natural for humans is essentially the classic poorly-thought-out statement that many carnists make: “Neanderthals and cavemen ate meat, so it’s natural!” I would remind you that infanticide, rape, murder and cannibalism are at least as ancient as meat eating, and yet we don’t use this fact to justify these immoral and unhealthy behaviors today. In any case, I wouldn’t recommend using the Neanderthals as the standard by which you measure the wisdom and morality of your current life choices. With the rise of the meat industry and factory farming, we are now consuming far more meat today – and it far different, completely unnatural forms – than our ancestors (or even many people in other nations around the world today) ever could have imagined, and the effect of this increase in meat consumption has been a host of diseases, from heart disease and cancer to diabetes and obesity. Recent research from Harvard and Cornell has shown that even a small amount of meat drastically increases your risk of cancer and early death, regardless of how the animals were raised.

      In fact, despite some people’s insistence that “humans are omnivores” there is actually a wealth of scientific information to suggest that humans evolved to be capable of eating meat occasionally, but that our bodies are not at all optimized for it. If you look up anatomy and taxonomy comparisons of carnivores, omnivores and herbivores, you will find that we are much more similar to herbivores on virtually every count – for example, carnivores and omnivores have very short intestinal tracts that are only 3-6x the length of their body, while herbivores have intestinal tracts 10-12x their body length; the ratio for humans is 10-11x. Similarly, animals optimized for eating meat have stomachs that are twenty times more acidic than the human stomach, which has the same acidity as that of herbivores. These features, and many others, allow carnivores and omnivores to process and move rotting flesh through their systems very quickly, and protects them from the effects of cholesterol that are so devastating to humans. As for human “canine teeth,” a quick review of animal and human anatomy will reveal that many other plant-eating animals have the exact same so-called canine teeth, for biting into fruits and vegetables, but that only plant-eating animals have molar teeth and jaws that move from side-to-side.

      If you really think we are omnivorous by nature, please show me a child that will catch, kill and eat a rabbit or a squirrel by choice, without any training. I have yet to see a child tear up and eat the family dog or cat, no matter how hungry they might be… but they will most certainly eat fruit or seeds without any prompting if they are lying around. Most children cry rather than salivate when they see an animal killed. In fact, when children first realize that they are eating dead animals, the vast majority are horrified. We have to teach children to eat animals, and actively convince them that it is natural, normal and okay, because really carnism is not part of their true nature at all.

      The fact that our bodies are not optimized for processing meat is overwhelmingly supported by research that shows that “Americans will not reduce their rate of cancers, cardiovascular disease and other chronic, degenerative diseases until they shift their diets away from animal-based foods to plant-based foods,” to quote Dr. Campbell at Carnell University. As a carnist your chance of getting heart disease – the number one cause of death for both men and women – is approximately 50% (flip a coin). As a vegan your risk would drop to less than 4%. Even a very small amount of meat has been shown to increase your risk of developing a myriad of cancers, and both Carnell and Harvard have now stated that the optimum amount of meat in the human diet is precisely zero, to borrow the words of Philip Wollen.

    • Kiara | Jul 26, 2012 at 5:01 pm

      As for your claim that we are better off spiritually consuming meat and animal products, you could not be more ill-informed. The Many of the greatest spiritual, philosophical and scientific minds throughout history have been vegan or vegetarian, and advocated for a vegetarian diet, including Albert Einstein, Charles Darwin, Sir Isaac Newton, Leonardo Da Vinci, Nikola Tesla, Thomas Edison, Pythagoras, Plato, Socrates, Epicurus, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Martin Luther King Jr., Susan B. Anthony, Srinivasa Ramanujan, Voltaire, Benjamin Franklin, Confucius, Leo Tolstoy, H.G. Wells, Cesar Chavez, Edward Witten, Brian Greene, Abraham Lincoln, George Shaw, Jesus Christ, Shakyamuni Buddha, just to name a few. Einstein's famous quote has now been confirmed by modern environmental research: "Nothing will benefit human health and increase chances of survival for life on earth as much as the evolution to a vegetarian diet." -Albert Einstein.

      Raising animals for meat is arguably the most environmentally destructive of all human activities; scientists estimate that 150-200 species of plant, insect, bird and mammal become extinct every 24 hours. Biologists say this is nearly 1,000 times the “natural” or “background” rate, and is greater than anything the world has experienced since the vanishing of the dinosaurs nearly 65 million years ago. To quote Thom Hartmann, “In the 24 hours since this time yesterday, over 200,000 acres of rainforest have been destroyed in our world. Fully 13 million tons of toxic chemicals have been released into our environment. Over 45,000 people have died from starvation, 38,000 of them children And more 130 plan and animal species have been driven to extinction by the actions of humans. And all this just since yesterday.” Scientists have confirmed that we are now indeed experiencing the sixth mass extinction in global history and that our very survival as a species is in jeopardy. Meat production contributes to pollution and global warming more than all modes of transportation in the entire world combined, and the majority of all fresh water and consumable grain around the globe is reserved for livestock to produce meat for a few greedy nations, even as people are starving. Even the United Nations is calling for a worldwide shift to a vegan diet as the ONLY way to avert mass starvation and global disaster, and to ensure the survival of the human species.

      Local “family farms” and “grass raised, grass fed” cows are not a viable solution to these problems, as I am sure you would suggest, because these “ethical” farms (aside from not being nearly so ethical as you might think) are actually exponentially more damaging to the environment in terms of land-use, energy use, water consumption and especially methane nitrous oxide production (greenhouse gases more potent than carbon that contribute greatly to global warming) than factory-farms. Additionally, it is not even possible to produce enough meat in this manner to allow carnists to continue with their flesh-eating habits. To satisfy the American meat habit, every single one of the 2.25 billion acres of United States land would have to be given over completely to cattle grazing… and additional land would still be needed. To sustain the world’s meat habit we would need the resources of two entire planet earths… and in case you hadn’t noticed… we only have the one.

      • Cleo | Jan 31, 2013 at 10:16 pm

        Excellent post Kiara!

  • Michelle | Mar 26, 2012 at 10:46 pm

    Hi Jessica I just want to say a big thankyou for passing on the invitation to watch this movie, we purchased Food matters last week and it just seemed to dove tail right in at the right time to get the benefit from the two productions together.
    I wish you sucess in your healthy lifestyle blogging

    • Jessica Nazarali

      Jessica Nazarali | Mar 26, 2012 at 11:28 pm

      Hi Michelle, I'm so pleased you enjoyed and benefited from the films! When similar films come out I will be sure to let you know :)

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  • Cyndie | Mar 2, 2013 at 12:11 pm

    Love this movie. It really got me thinking.

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  • _C_ | Apr 2, 2013 at 4:57 am

    Kiara, you're amazing.

    One thing has occurred to me when people bring up "cave men diets." Even if we did eat primarily meat, and began to domesticate foods and animals say, for argument, 12,000 to 20,000 years ago, don't you think that our bodies would have adjusted to that new diet by now? Those who couldn't hack it would have been weak and died. We've managed to domesticate animals to be extremely different from their ancestors in that time. What other bird lays an egg just about every day? They had to eat completely differently to do it. Just saying.

    Plus, it's impossible to eat the same diet as the imagined carnivorous cave man. The meat we eat today is fatty and tender, instead of lean and stringy. If you eat the common stuff, the animals were fed industrialized corn and perhaps unmentionables, like discards from slaughter houses. Then all the chemicals, heavy metals, and toxins we've been dumping into our environment, or inject or feed to the animal directly, are concentrated in that meat over their lifetimes. Some of these items affect hormones, as well as other bodily processes. I'd rather look at research that investigates our world today rather than a long-gone mythical and theoretical world of the ancient past. "The China Study" does just that.

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